Chili Peppers I plan to Grow: Mako Akokosrade

Chili Peppers I plan to Grow: Mako Akokosrade

This post is the first in my series of “chili peppers I Plan to Grow” and will contain some information on the Mako Akokɔsrade (Akokosrade, Akokotsrade).

Mako akokɔsrade

I got these seeds when I traded some of my Poblano, Carolina Reaper, and Apocalypse Scorpion Chocolate seeds. Unfortunately,  I have not been able to find that much information on this chili variety. But from what I have read on different chili pepper forums Mako Akokɔsrade is a type of Capsicum Chinense chili. Below follow the information I’ve compiled from different sources around the internet.


This variety is a rare chili pepper that originates from Ghana, Africa. When I searched the for information I only found information on different forum posts, and YouTube videos (for example, see below).

Seeds from the Mako Akokosrade

“MakoAkokɔsrade”  in the African Twi language means “Yellow Chili”. I think that Mako Akokɔsrade is a very interesting chili. The plants grow around 60 cm high with 5-7 cm long fruits. The chilies begin with a light green color and end up with a beautiful golden color when ripened.


Mako Akokɔsrade is a very strong chili that has a unique fruity flavor with elements of pineapple and melon. People have described the taste of the chili fruits as juicy, fruity, and distinct. Still, it has the typical, at least slightly, Capsicum Chinense flavor. This chili is perfect as a spice in hot cooking, like powder, or in a hot sauce along with fruits like mango, pineapple and the like. Here’s someone reviewing the taste of the chili:


There is no, to my knowledge, information on exactly how hot this pepper is. That is, it has yet to be measured on the Scoville Heat Units (SHU).  The Mako akokɔsrade chill has been described to be slightly hotter compared to an Orange Habanero.  The guy who sent me the seeds said that the plants give a lot of fruits.

Most of the chili peppers I have heard of, have seeds and/or is planning to grow, I have been able to found more information on compared to the Mako Akokɔsrade. The “mystique” surrounding this pepper, and the intriguing taste description, makes me really want to grow it.

Too bad that the winter is coming where I live. Because I am pretty soon running out of space in my grow tent. As soon as I find space or the spring is here, I will start germinating one or two seeds. When I do, I will take photographs and write about my experience with growing, cooking, and eating this pepper!

If you happen to know anything about the heat (Scoville, preferably), the taste, or how to best grow Mako akokɔsrade, please leave a comment below.

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